My very sensitive 4-yr old (she cries when she sees cartoons disagreeing) refuses to talk to me or crumples her work when I try to teach her. For example, when I tell her that the correct way to write the letter O is to start from the top instead of the bottom. Worried that the more she continues to do it, the harder it will be for her to correct. How do I help her see being corrected in a more positive way?

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Most people, including children don't like to be told they are wrong. If you start with "That's wrong ...", it might immediately cause her to react emotionally to the task. At 4, her mental management skills are not fully developed and she would find it difficult to manage her emotions. Perhaps you can try a different approach. You might praise her for her effort (not work) and then ask her if she is happy with her work. You could also ask her if she would like to know how to make her work even better. Or say, Mummy writes her "O" this way, how is that the same or different than the way you write? Let's do it together, I will show you how to do it.

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My friend found this article helpful (but for a different situation) https://ph.theasianparent.com/13-psychologist-approved-phrases-to-calm-an-angry-child/ I guess the things we can pick up from it are: - Let her know that you're figuring out the solution together - Ask her to come up with the solution (ie ask "How can you make the O look fatter" instead of teaching the proper way) - Acknowledge her feelings ("Are you getting frustrated? It's okay to feel frustrated." - Let her know that you had difficulty with it too when you were young so she doesn't feel like she's the only one who gets things wrong

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